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are the numbers to use if you are a student or a graduate. -- you are a parent, - use for educators and administrators, the number is -- please make sure you meet thae - mute the tv when you call in. hasg tag, @cspan. our facebook poll has been up for a number of hours. you can go to span. is college worth going into debt? let's go to new york and hear from marian wang. she is the education reporter for propublica joining us byvia skype. >> thank you for having me. >> what got you interested in the area of student debt? >> there are record numbers for student debt. i began covering education. i got sucked into it. so much is happening in that space. there are hard economic times that is putting an extra crunch on students and families at a time and college costs keep rising. >> we showed audiences the -- the conversation you participated in a couple of months ago. the scope of the issue and the size of the student debt that we are dealing with these days. >> the government issued more than a hundred billion dollars in student loans to families and grad students and p
academy is igniting a controversial online education revolution, thanks to one man, youtube channel, and tens of millions of students around the world. >>> and the power of 20. a record 20 female senators are sworn in today and they tell diane sawyer how they're planning to make history in an abc exclusive. >>> from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," january 3rd, 2013. >>> good evening. i'm bill weir. and it is the dream of countless american families. a knock on the door from a big-time college football scout and a spot on a team that fills coliseums on saturday. but tonight comes a revelation from a former star about the pain and pressure that exists inside the nation's football factories and the injectable risks some young men take in order to stay on the field. abc news's chief investigative correspondent brian ross brings us this "nightline investigates." >> reporter: game day at usc in los angeles. part of the huge college sports industry. with lucrative tv contracts, millionaire coaches an
that. as i said later, i'm not very educated in this field. >> reporter: do you think you might be now? >> you educated me. thank you. >> reporter: this seems to be a collective ignorance about the painkillers used in college football. the governing body, the ncaa, told us it does not regulate nor even keep track of the use of toridol and other painkillers on college athletes. >> if we keep track of what happens to horses in horseracing, don't we owe it to the athletes to keep track of what's going on in college sports? >> reporter: of the top 25 college football programs contacted by abc news, 16 of them refused to say whether they use toridol. only four including usc admitted they did. armen armistead says he is now fully recovered, and to prove that to nfl scouts, he played in the canadian football league where his team, toronto, won that country's version of the super bowl, and he was named to the all-star team as a rookie, all done without any toridol, a drug armistead says he would like now to see banned. >> if you can't play through the pain, maybe you should just sit out and re
telling to your member of congress. >> two other things. on the department of education side think they will work on the mess, and hope we do a better job with the servicers reining in the problems. it is important that they have it is important that they have been hearing about this problem so much. that is one thing that does not require congressional action. another thing is the consumer financial protection bureau is sort of the new game in town as far as this goes. people do not think of them as a federal student loan side, they primarily have jurisdiction over private student loans. there will be quite active, talking about some of the predatory practices, but even on the federal student loan side the consumer financial protection bureau has jurisdiction over debt collectors and some of the servicers. it is not the biggest picture issues we have been talking about so much, but on the ground for people right now who have already borrowed, clients like mine having the existing programs that work well, it is incredibly important. hopefully a lot is going to happen in that area.
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
on what some catholic school systems are doing to try to survive? >> our educational system was imploding. enrollment-wise, finance wise, something radical, radical surgery had to be done. >> announcer: major funding for "religion & ethics news weekly" is dedicated to i founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual group and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the january henson foundation, and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. arguments continue over the so-called "fiscal cliff" deal approved this week in the fina minutes of the 112th congress. and religious groups are among those weighing in. the family research council criticized the deal for not including spending cuts and entitlement reforms. meanwhile, leaders of the christian group bread for the world said while the measure isn't perfect, they believe it will "prevent major economic damage that would have affected hungry and poo
, education, and leadership. our president is one of the co-chairs of the council. it is my great pleasure to introduce him this evening. he is a scholar, advocate, and a true friend of afghanistan. pls -- [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and your work as vice chair of the u.s. afghan women's council. i wish to thank the members from the delegation from afghanistan, u.s. afghan women's council and all of our guests from around the world for joining us this evening. it is a privilege to welcome back to georgetown the president of afghanistan hamid karzai. we look forward to hearing his remark on afghanistan beyond 2014, a perspective on afghan-u.s. relations. 2014 will be an historic year for afghanistan as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through th
else, the other part of that strategy and that goal is to do a much more serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of
in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. city. thank you. [horns honking] announcer: big dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to man: 60-inch screen, high-definitio
education and jobs and surl celebration and bring to you jesse jackson who will speak to you and how we pay the price for peace in this city. [applause] >> amos, are you presenting me with the quilt? i want my quilt. i want my quilt. i am delighted to be here with you today. so many years ago i met -- dr. king and i went to minnesota and reverend amos was then pastoring in minnesota before the snow chased him to san francisco and knew dr. king and his father and had a class in moore house of seven students. dr. brown and members of the class and knew them before and before then and he brings a lean yaj of struggle to the table every time he speaks with tremendous morale authority and stroke couldn't stop him for fight wg great power. [applause] i want to thank mayor ed lee for convening the family. for all the times we think of leading from the front. often you lead from the center. you have the power to convene the family, to look at a family crisis and think it through, and it figure it out, and if we can get out of our own's self way we might find solutions to a problem that is
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
not addressing the costs of education at all. it is about increasing government funding to help students go to school. we need to be focusing on and we need to be focusing on what are the costs that can be reduced to bring these costs down, make schools more competitive, so students have a competitive choice of which university to go to. >> we will let you go, as we hear from traunch mitchell. -- josh mitchell. >> a lot of schools are starting to increase things at a faster pace. i think there is so much scrutiny these days. it is kind of like health care. why are costs rising? i think they're going to start to see a lot of pressure from congress to rein in their costs. >> josh mitchell writes for "the wall street journal," and thanks for spending the last half hour with us. >> yes. >> and we appreciate all of your phone calls, comments on twitter, and the conversation continues online, and the question we have been asking is, how much debt is worth going into college? [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013
. >>> the pakistani teenager nearly killed for her push for girls' education rights now back with her family, but will she be returning to pakistan to continue her fight? the latest on malhala's story coming up. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. take long. i'm done. are you thinking what i'm thinking? ♪ give me just a little more time ♪ okay. all right. oh! [ female announcer ] the 2-in-1 swiffer sweeper uses electrostatic dry cloths to clean better than a broom. and its wet mopping cloths can clean better than a mop in half the time so you don't miss a thing. mom, have you seen my -- hey! hey! he did it. [ female announcer ] swiffer. better clean in half the time. or your money back. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you g
is a massive public education campaign for parents and educators. for people about how to use these tools responsibly. >> we are still adapting as a society and learning what it means to be exposed due to the way we track our lives and share information online. and i do agree with that. that's part of the problem here, getting everyone educated. >> right now employers are saying, all right, if you want a job come you have to tell us your password so we can go on your private website. >> the bottom line is there are laws governing employment in the united states. there are certain things an employer can ask and certain things they cannot pass. an employer cannot ask marital status. an employer cannot use that information against you in a hiring decision. >> but how do you prove that? >> we need additional loss? i don't know. there are laws on the books right now. once we had it last summer opened my eyes to a lot of information that employers can gather on people. there is a startup company who is running their business like the way a credit reporting agency runs their business. so what th
a little more sleep can improve student health and education. the school board wonders if this idea will and to be expensive. >> seven 17 a.m. that is when school begins and anne arundel county. according to research, it is the early as wake up all in the state. heather leads the group start school later, which now has chapters in many states. she is petitioning to the school board with signatures to let students sleep in a bit longer. >> we know the health impacts of sleep approbation that the kids are experiencing. it is quite experience. some of the long-term impacts are not know. >> bus pickup times can be as early as i 50 a.m. that is dark in the winter. that is a safety issue. >> no student should be on a bus earlier than 7 a.m. and not earlier than 8 a.m. in a classroom. dr. owen says it is well- documented that in adolescents body chemistry affects their sleep. >> there is a natural shift in wake and sleep time that is associated with problems of teenagers getting to sleep much before 11 p.m. they simply cannot small -- they cannot fall asleep. >> high school as an middle sc
killed by the taliban for promoting girls' education was released from the hospital today. the attack in october led to worldwide condemnation, and an outpouring of sympathy for her cause. nbc's keir simmons has more tonight. >> reporter: malala walking from the hospital today. a strong woman, her doctors say, making excellent progress. in pictures released by the hospital, the affection of her nurses is evident. >> i think it's fantastic news she has come out of the hospital. and it's actually particularly a relief to her family. >> reporter: family members in the uk have visited regularly but doctors decided living with them would help her recovery. >> they were finding it difficult to properly educate her in the hospital. so they wanted her to be even more with the family, because only father and mother were allowed every day. >> reporter: just three months ago in pakistan, malala was near death, shot in the head by the taliban. they were angered by her campaign for women's education. >> if you can help us, please help. >> reporter: instead of killing her, they made this teenage gi
perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of the appropriations committee. how that will change, we will see. we have more and more -- patty murray, dianne feinstein. these are significant changes. very interesting on the house side. we have seven women ranking on major committees and the house. the house republicans have zero women cheering any major committees. they are all white men and have one woman chairing a minor committee and that is the administration committee. we feel we are in a great place. froml see a lot of work emily's list to get the majority of back in the house. host: what role did your organization plate in the election of these women? guest: we are in it for the long haul. emily's list has been working with some women since they were in the state leg
thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don'
advisory commission, comprised of experts in mental health, education, law enforcement, and first response. we may never know what motivated the events at sandy hook elementary, but that won't stop us from working to prevent future tragedy. over the coming months, the commission will come together to make specific, actionable recommendations in the areas of school safety, mental health services, and gun violence prevention. this session, i know there will be others that take action on these issues, and i applaud those efforts. the more resources we can bring to bear on this issue, the better. working together we can and will affect real change. there are some things we know already. we know that we must find ways to better respond to those with mental health needs. as a society, we have an obligation to take action in a meaningful way when a person seeks our help or demonstrates a need for it. we must balance our respect for individual rights with our obligation to provide for the greater public safety. and when it comes to preventing future acts of violence in our schools, let me say this
for those of innovation that can help shift the task to work being done by educated eco-and the interface between service provider and community and increase the demand. but if we don't ship to innovation, way. >> i should clarify for audience that the human immune system i very specifically targeted by the hiv virus. so as your cd-4 count goes down, you're headed for his part said the case of the disease. we have time for one more question. i think i sought and stars of family care international but air. >> thanks, laurie. i wanted to ask if you could, specifically in what you see as priorities and transcendent possibilities in sub-saharan africa, the region where the problem of hiv/aids is most severe in terms of population and in particular from the perspective of the long-term potential and the question of the most strategic approach in terms of dealing with hava is more or less of it or to publish your integrate cnet with the provision of basic health services, reproductive, newborn and maternal services, what you see is the most appropriate strategy for dealing with this in africa.
a national communications network, in gauging the on issues ranging from transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states
and replenish our beaches. our department of education has worked night and day to get schools reopened right away, and where that wasn't possible, to get them restored by the next school year, all while maintaining our commitment to a full 180-day school year of education for our kids. executive order 107 makes sure that when insurance payments do come, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles and ensures that our citizens maximize their reimbursement. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the miracle of route 35 in mantoloking. at the mantoloking bridge, route 35 had been completely washed away by sandy. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flowed into the bay where route 35 once carried thousands of cars a day to vacations down the shore. within days, commissioner jim simpson, the department of transportation and our private sector partners had a temporary road built to allow emergency vehicles onto the island. now, merely 10 weeks after our state's worst storm, you see a perma
opinion because people aren't educated on the law. they're not educated on these matters, and it's just inappropriate. >> if it's out there now, just to be clear, so do you disagree with the other attorney representing mr. mays, having put this piece of information out there? >> i don't disagree. i think at some point there has to be balance. and to protect the fairness of the proceedings, you know, this case has to be tried eventually. what has occurred, there has been an atmosphere of intimidation and coercion that has made our witnesses reluctant to come forward. well, if we don't have -- >> you're saying this is a bit of a defensive posture. >> let me ask you about this other thing that susan brought up as well, this photo. >> if i may finish. >> go ahead. >> if i may finish. it is the ethical thing to do on behalf of a client. when the balance of the case has gotten out of control due to parties that have nothing to do with the case. you know, and let me just say, i think this was a problem for everyone's concern. every time that video is shown and now viral, this young lady is sub
the fruit and play with the chicken. it is as much of educational outreach and increase our interaction with our community 100 fold. this is the second season. this has brought us closer to our community. gerri: if you cannot grow a vegetable garden, i do you have any rights at all how to use your own property that you pay for? >> we pay taxes we have owned the land 20 years. it is our property. when they take our garden, what is next? >> asserts with food they slowly take away everything. it is not a hobby. gerri: it is not like it is marijuana. right? >> not surprising that a business show was the first national one to pick it up. it is about money we save thousands of dollars per year because of our healthy nutritious organic garden. it re-read to a garage restore it would cost a lot of money and we get that for free. gerri: somebody has to tend the garden. not totally free. [laughter] let us know what happens. says the city really go away? keep us in the loop with what is happening. we're interested. i believe in property rights and desperate to know what happens. jennifer and jason
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
was shot in the head. her crime was campaigning for girls to be educated. and jeremy has this report. >> a remarkable recovery, hard to believe as she walked out of a hospital. her survival was against the odds, the extent of her recovery delighted the medical staff. she says a thank-you to the nurses and doctors here. she is off to a temporary home that they have set up. something of a normal life after so much pain and separation. >> she could talk, it was a good side of her brain had not been damaged. ha >> going to school, the same right to education. her case has attracted worldwide coverage and support. >> the genuinely an inspiration for millions of other people around the world as well. the world did stand up. >> she was rushed to hospital and it became clear that the bullet wound needed a more sophisticated life-saving treatment. the teenager was brought to birmingham. with her family at her side, she has been talking, walking, ready to go home. in a few weeks, she will be back here for major reconstructive surgery on her skull. but for now, a moment of joy, looking forward
mentioned. perhaps better voter education about the tools that are out there to help them know where they need to vote, more staffing at the polling places where a captain or assistant captain could actually go through the front lines, the czech and lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone -- checkin lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone got any questions? i can check for you. that has become a real issue with all of the precincts. so come up voter education might be part of it, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells
of mental health, education, for example, are part of this problem and need to be addressed as part of the effort that vice-president biden is undertaking. >> of some supporters say there are about freedom and control, it's not the answer. >> bad guys are not stupid, they're just bad. if their intent on doing something bad it will get a firearm and use it. >> they can also be used for protection. a mother at home with her twins fire her 38 caliber revolver when ex-convict broke into their home in the room where there were hiding when the man. the newly elected pro-second amendment senate democrat is worried about overreaching. >> said think you need to put everything on the table, but what i hear from the administration, that is weight in the extreme of what i think is necessary or even should be talked about, and it is not going to pass. >> an associated press analysis reveals there was a huge increase in background checks for gun sales and permits at the end of 12. in colorado following the or a movie theater shooting in the connecticut after the sandy hook school shooting, there
of the time. we need to do everything we've been doing with the economy, education, etc. we also need to address the plague and scourge of gun violence. we need to address hurricane sandy. so, yes, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at ful
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
of education executive order. roosevelt interned japanese americans. so, there's a lot of -- reagan by the way, banned abortions in military hospitals. executive order. so a lot of big policies have started out as executive orders, but overruling the second amendment, it's a tough concept. >> he can't say i ban -- do a new assault weapons ban or something like that? >> he can't do that. he has power of the executive branch. and he can, i can come up with ways that he can do it. he could ban the military from participating in sporting events with the nra where these assault rifles are used. he could ban funding of certain programs. there are ways he can work around the edges of gun control, but i cannot see how he would ban weapons outright. >> first of all, reality check. an executive order cannot supersede the constitution. so everyone just chill out. we have a lot of record as paul just said, of executive orders being done -- w. had 291 executive orders. again, reality check. in terms of what the president could do, in some ways, it's consistent with what the nra calls for. three things the
colleagues tend to be older man, educated in a certain way that did not study such matters. most historians were not educated in matters of a heart or the hearth. therefore they ignore that. it is on cannon's crowds of kings. so by studying the first lady, for example, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in eight lost outside of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he does go shopping. he went shopping for martha, his wife. mr. she was preggers. she had had a miscarriage. he mr., and he bought her some clothes. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so that he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there in campus is george washington suffering through the freezing weather at valley forge was martha washington with her white on it right there in camp. so by studying the first ladies, we get new insights, i think, the presidents and other things. also, washington's closest adviser was alexander hamilton. and one of the chapters in the book talks about
are truly prosperous. you can see the web sites. they take into account opportunity, education, health, personal safety, and other categories. the idea being it is that does the money but how happy you are. having introduced that index, i don't agree with its findings. we rank 12th out of 142 nations. take a look at where we have high marks. health. it surprised me until i read the offer -- office considered lobbying and public spending. education, the authors say quality of and access to schools is contributing mightily to prosperity. governance, number ten. presumably the data was tallied 04 of congress dithered. another number ten rating as what that study called social capital. with the authors mean by that is just social cohesion. family and community ties that contribute to well-being. the study in the following performance, and this mystified me. the economy. the highest gdp in the world, but the authors of the -- also greeted us on unemployment and personal savings rates. entrepreneur real ship with, we scored low. frankly, this is one i simply don't get since starting a busine
. >> was different? do you think that educators should allow more choice among the young [inaudible question] >> this is a fascinating question we could spend an hour on. must public-school education, that's what you are suggesting. i know that's what you're suggesting. [laughter] >> okay. one of the things that i have found, and i only took over this in recent years. i have gone over certain things. in high school i was exposed to stuff the bored me to death at the time. thirty or for 40 years later, i remember it with vividness. and then we have an appreciation i can still remember the night watch. canterbury tales by chaucer. all of these things that our children need to be exposed to and not just how i pass this math and science tests. how i get through the next day. it would be a shame we don't expose our children to the right things and give them greater choice with what they want to do with their life. most of them at that age are not sure. sooner or later, something will touch them. i know where i'd be if my life and have been a pattern of 17. keep looking for the thing that you'd do
and he only been working at goodyear just a little over one year. he had less education unless experience. and he already made $600 more a month than i did from a lower paying job. the judge calculated my two years backpay, and i was given 30,000 per year. so i left the courtroom with $360,000. the headlines said from california to chicago to new york and florida, all across this nation -- the headlines read jacksonville, alabama, woman awarded $3.8 million from goodyear tire and rubber. they say that i got that money. the gadsden headline said that as well. i got a lot of compliments of the headlines in the news. well, that was 2003. he went to the 11th circuit record and then my guilt was hurt in the supreme court in november of 2006. life goes on. we had our normal family life the best we could do. but i worked the case just like it was a job. i called over 100 people to find the people that we needed to testify on my behalf. people were afraid of losing their jobs. they were so afraid. that is why they switched over. most of this was color coded. but life went on and my husband had tw
to be stress relief. >> reporter: experts say more education is needed to help young women make wise choices about whether they should drink alcohol and how much. rehema ellis, nbc news, new york. >>> and we're back in a moment with the night the luck o' the irish ran out. ♪ chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. >>> we learned overnight one of the great nonfiction writers of our times, richard ben cramer, has died. if you were a young journalist in this country wanting to know how best to cover politics, campaigns and politicians, richard cramer's book "what it takes" it all it took. it chronicled the 1988 campaign as it focused on bush 41, on bush 41, dukakis, biden and all the educated at johns hopkins and columbia. richard ben cramer died of lung cancer at the age of 62. >>> well, you know how they say roll tide. the tide certainly rolled right over notre dame last night as alabama owned the bcs college championship game. from the get-go there were sad irish eyes all over this today. a 42-14 thumping for the
aspect. that is education. i think of the national level or state level rules for sort of outcomes in education. i'm looking at this map and as you pointed out, not only is it is map where crime is in the city, it's a map where you have low performing schools. ought we not put lead on top of our outcomes and not saying you have to close your school because you are dealing with students who are lead poisoned. >> correct. the mapping of a city is really easy to do. it's much -- ethically, it's more important to do something like that where you get at the source than measure blood level. we use the child to indicate what is environment is like and try to turn it around to primary prevention in measuring the environment and try to prevent the child from getting exposed. it turns out soil is very easy to measure the amount of lead in soil. we are doing a lot of work in the city of new orleans to try to advance changing the environment so that children don't get exposed. >> i really appreciate that shift. rather than thinking of the kid as the problem, we think of the environment. thank
work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bi
the proper training, schooling education, background to monitor 40 children. >> reporter: police have not released the video and not given out many details about the alleged assault. detectives believe there may be other victims anyone with information is asked to contact the prince georges county child and vulnerable adult unit. go to to find out how to call police and remain anonymous. >>> more on a story you fist heard on fox -- first heard on fox 5. a dc police officer charged with having sex with an under aged girl he met in a church choir. a woman came forward last march and accused him of sexually assaulting her when she was 11 years old he was director of a youth choir at a southeast dc church she sang in it. the abuse lasted two years. >>> health alert, people across the country have been hit with fever, chills and severe cough. flu outbreak has spread to almost every state. in maryland emergency room visits are skyrocketing. the strain of flu is hitting earlier and causing severe symptoms. audrey. >> reporter: health officials say this could be the worst flu seas
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